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You are here:  Home | Health and social care | Services for older people | Dementia
Dementia
 
 
New Forest District Council is working with partners through the New Forest Health and Wellbeing Partnership Board to raise awareness of the issues relating to dementia and support the development of a range of services for people who are living with dementia.

For further information on the development work of the partnership please contact nikki.luddington@nfdc.gov.uk or phone 02380 285588.

Current work in the New Forest

What is dementia?

Health and wellbeingDementia is not one illness but a group of symptoms caused by damage to the brain. Dementia is caused by a number of diseases of the brain, the most common of which is Alzheimer's disease. Vascular dementia is the second most common cause. High blood pressure, heart problems, high cholesterol and diabetes can increase the chances of developing vascular dementia.

Dementia is progressive, which means the symptoms will gradually get worse. How fast dementia progresses will depend on the individual person and what type of dementia they have.

Each person is unique and will experience dementia in their own way. It is often the case that the person's family and friends are more concerned about the symptoms than the person may be themselves.

What are the signs of dementia?

The Government recently launched an awareness campaign this tells you what signs you should look out for which could be the early symptoms of dementia. These are:

  • struggling to remember recent events, but easily recalling things that happened in the past
  • struggling to follow conversations or programmes on TV
  • forgetting the names of friends or everyday objects
  • repeating things or losing the thread of what's being said
  • having problems thinking or reasoning
  • feeling anxious, depressed or angry about memory loss
  • feeling confused even when in a familiar environment

What to do next if you are concerned

If you are worried about someone the most important thing to do is to encourage them to go and see their doctor. The sooner the better, this is because spotting the signs of dementia early means they can get the right treatment and support as soon as possible.

Although there is currently no cure for dementia, treatment and support can help people live active and fulfilling lives with dementia. In some cases a specialist may be able to prescribe medication that can help reduce symptoms of dementia and help cope with it. There is a lot that you can do in the early stages that can help to make life easier and more enjoyable, both now and in the future.

You may find it useful to read The Alzheimer's Society leaflet 'What if I have dementia'.

Useful websites   

The Alzheimer's Society
factsheets cover a wide range of dementia-related topics.

NHS Choices (dementia)

Dementia UK

Age UK

Age Concern New Forest

Fenwick2 Lyndhurst Wellbeing Centre

Carers together

New Forest Disability Information Service

Department of Health (Dementia)    

Community First New Forest Home Support Service

Hampshire County Council's website has a range of information on independent living for older people.  It also includes information from partner agencies, district and borough councils, charities and voluntary organisations.

An NHS awareness campaign for carers of people with dementia and for patients who have dementia. Courses are designed to provide information, support and advice in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. You can access this course if:

  • you are caring for someone with dementia who currently uses Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust services, or
  • you are one of their patients with dementia